Year 10 Achievement Standards

English+

Year 10 Achievement Standard

A resource is currently being developed to support teachers to monitor students’ handwriting behaviours.

Reading and Viewing

At Standard, students evaluate how text structures can be used in innovative ways by different authors. They explain how the choice of language features, images and vocabulary contributes to the development of individual style. They develop and justify their own interpretations of texts. They evaluate other interpretations, analysing the evidence used to support them.

Writing and Creating

Students show how the selection of language features can achieve precision and stylistic effect. They explain different viewpoints, attitudes and perspectives through the development of cohesive and logical arguments. They develop their own style by experimenting with language features, stylistic devices, text structures and images. Students create a wide range of texts to articulate complex ideas. They demonstrate understanding of grammar, vary vocabulary choices for impact, and accurately use spelling and punctuation when creating and editing texts.

Speaking and Listening

Students listen for ways features within texts can be manipulated to achieve particular effects. They show how the selection of language features can achieve precision and stylistic effect. Students explain different viewpoints, attitudes and perspectives through the development of cohesive and logical arguments. They develop their own style by experimenting with language features, stylistic devices, text structures and images. Students create a wide range of texts to articulate complex ideas. They make presentations and contribute actively to class and group discussions, building on others' ideas, solving problems, justifying opinions and developing and expanding arguments.

Health and Physical Education+

Achievement standard

Health Education

At Standard, students explain the impact of social and cultural influences on personal identity and health, safety and wellbeing, including stereotypes and gender, diversity and cultural differences. They analyse media messages about health, and propose and evaluate interventions to improve individual and community health and wellbeing.

Students evaluate the impact of emotional responses on relationships and apply skills and strategies to promote respectful relationships, such as taking action to address disrespect or other inappropriate behaviour.

Physical Education

At Standard, students select, use and evaluate individual movement skills and sequences and implement tactics appropriate to the physical activity context, based on the outcome of previous performances. They apply appropriate technique while performing skills that increase in complexity.

Students describe acceleration and force absorption in relation to physical activity and improving performance. They describe ways to measure hydration and perceived exertion in response to physical activity. Students demonstrate ethical behaviour in competitive contexts and apply skills and strategies to improve team performance.

Humanities and Social Sciences+

Achievement standard

At Standard, students construct a range of questions and hypotheses involving cause and effect, patterns and trends, and different perspectives. They use a range of methods to select, record and organise relevant information and/or data from multiple sources. When interpreting sources, students identify their origin and purpose, and draw conclusions about their usefulness. They examine sources to compare different points of view/perspectives and describe different interpretations. Students analyse information and/or data to identify simple patterns, trends, relationships and/or change over time. They draw evidence-based conclusions, using information and/or data to consider multiple perspectives and/or to propose action in response to contemporary challenges. Students develop a range of texts appropriate to the type of discussion and/or explanation required. They use subject-specific terminology and concepts, and provide evidence from a range of sources to support conclusions, and acknowledge these sources.

Students describe key features of the Westminster system and Australia’s democratic values. They make comparisons between Australia’s democracy and the political system of one other country. Students identify the international agreements Australia has ratified, and make connections between these agreements and the rights and responsibilities of citizens. They explain how Australia’s democracy, and other democracies, may be undermined, and identify the safeguards that protect Australia’s democratic system.

Students use economic indicators to analyse the economic performance of the Australian economy. They describe how government policy is used to manage the economy and improve economic performance and living standards, including the redistribution of income and wealth. Students describe how businesses respond to changing economic conditions, and explain how the different sectors in the economy are interdependent.

Students describe how the places in which people live influence their wellbeing and opportunities. They describe the interconnections between people and natural environments, and compare how the characteristics of places and natural environments can be influenced, changed and managed by people over time. Students predict the consequences of the changes, and describe the alternate views on strategies to sustainably manage a geographical challenge.

Students identify the causes and effects of World War II and the development of people’s rights and freedoms, describing their significance from a range of perspectives. They refer to key events, the actions of individuals and groups, and beliefs and values, to explain patterns of change and continuity over time. Students describe different interpretations of the past, and identify the evidence used to support these interpretations.

Mathematics+

Year 10 Achievement Standard

Number and Algebra

At Standard, students recognise the connection between simple and compound interest. They solve problems involving linear equations and inequalities. Students make the connections between algebraic and graphical representations of relations. They expand binomial expressions and factorise monic quadratic expressions. Students find unknown values after substitution into formulas. They perform the four operations with simple algebraic fractions. Students solve simple quadratic equations and pairs of simultaneous equations.

Measurement and Geometry

Students solve surface area and volume problems relating to composite solids. They recognise the relationships between parallel and perpendicular lines. Students apply deductive reasoning to proofs and numerical exercises involving plane shapes. They use triangle and angle properties to prove congruence and similarity. Students use trigonometry to calculate unknown angles in right-angled triangles.

Statistics and Probability

Students compare data sets by referring to the shapes of the various data displays. They describe bivariate data where the independent variable is time. Students describe statistical relationships between two continuous variables. They evaluate statistical reports. Students list outcomes for multi-step chance experiments and assign probabilities for these experiments. They calculate quartiles and inter-quartile ranges.

Science+

Year 10 Achievement Standard

Science Understanding

At Standard, students analyse how the periodic table organises elements and use it to make predictions about the properties of elements. They explain how chemical reactions are used to produce particular products and how different factors influence the rate of reactions. Students apply relationships between force, mass and acceleration to predict changes in the motion of objects. They explain the concept of energy conservation and represent energy transfer and transformation within systems. Students describe and analyse interactions and cycles within and between Earth’s spheres. They describe the evidence for scientific theories that explain the origin of the universe and the diversity of life on Earth. Students explain the processes that underpin heredity and evolution.

Science as a Human Endeavour

Students analyse how the models and theories they use have developed over time.

Science Inquiry Skills

Students develop questions and hypotheses and independently design and improve appropriate methods of investigation. They describe how they have considered reliability, safety, fairness and ethical actions in their methods. When analysing data, selecting evidence and developing conclusions, students identify any sources of uncertainty. They evaluate the validity and reliability of claims made in secondary sources with reference to the evidence cited. Students construct evidence-based arguments and select appropriate representations to communicate science ideas.

Languages

Chinese+

Achievement standard

At standard, students initiate and participate in sustained spoken and written interactions in Chinese with others through collaborative tasks, activities and transactions to provide information on young people’s experiences and interest in contemporary culture and social issues, such as
我不太同意你的说法 and 但是…所以我觉得…. They use familiar descriptive and expressive language, in formal and some informal exchanges, toexchange information, request clarification or confirmation, solve problems and manage diverse views. Students analyse, synthesise and evaluate some ideas and information from a range of perspectives in spoken texts related to aspects of their personal, natural and social worlds, and identify most of the ways that context and culture affect how information is presented. They collate and present in written form a range of perspectives on texts related to aspects of their personal, natural and social worlds, and identify most of the ways that context and culture affect how information is presented. Students engage with imaginative performance-based texts and respond by discussing attitudes portrayed, expressing opinions, explaining themes, discussing characters and considering language use and cultural meanings, and apply these to create and perform their own spoken imaginative texts. They create simple written imaginative texts that express aspects of Chinese culture for different audiences, and identify how some concepts can be readily translated between Chinese and English and some cannot. When translating and interpreting from one language to another, students describe how cultural perspectives and concepts have been represented. They describe the experience of learning and using Chinese, considering how intercultural communication involves taking responsibility by modifying language and behaviours. They also explore and express their own cultural identity and ability to act as a cultural mediator between Chinese speakers and Australians.

Students better understand the systems of the Chinese language, explaining, in part, differences in intonation, rhythm and sounds when listening to speakers of different ages, genders and social positions. They examine and explain, in part, the relationships between characters and word meanings when encountering new vocabulary. Students use metalanguage to describe the distinctive spoken and written language system of Chinese. In spoken and written texts, students use familiar vocabulary, with a satisfactory level of accuracy. They analyse how elements of grammar impact on the making of meaning in texts, including justifying opinions and building logical arguments by expressing additional information and providing reasons, for example, using 不但…而且…; 除了…以外; 另外, and introducing contrasting views to others using elements, such as cohesive devices, for example, 不是…而是…;不过,虽然…但是…. Students explore the ways in which language can be manipulated to make ideas more objective, for example, the removal of personal pronouns and opinions. They experiment with the use of 成语 (Chinese set expressions) and famous sayings to substantiate ideas in Chinese. Students experiment with 的 as a subject modifier to express ideas that would contain relative clauses in English, for example, 我昨天买的书不太贵. They compare the purposes, text structures and language features of traditional and contemporary Chinese texts. Students explain how Chinese language and culture have evolved and continue to change over time, and identify how language use has the power to influence social relationships, beliefs and values. They explain how language defines people’s roles as outsiders or insiders in groups and cultures. Students analyse the ways in which language choices reflect cultural practices and values, and describe how language is used to express familiarity and distance between participants in interactions.

Japanese+

Achievement standard

At standard, students initiate and participate in sustained spoken and written interactions in Japanese with others through collaborative tasks, activities and transactions to exchange information on young people’s experiences and interest in contemporary culture and social issues. They use familiar descriptive and expressive language in formal and informal exchanges to express feelings and justify personal opinions, such as 日本のリサイクルはかなりきびしいです。 Students sustain, and sometimes extend, interactions to exchange resources and information, solve problems and manage diverse views. Students compare and evaluate some ideas and information from a range of perspectives, identifying how context and culture affect how information is presented. They use modes of presentation, appropriate to audiences or purposes, to convey information, comments, perspectives and experiences on texts related to aspects of their personal, natural and social worlds. Students explain how humorous, emotional or aesthetic effects are used in imaginative texts to reflect cultural values or experiences. They create and present simple imaginative texts on familiar personal or social themes that express ideas or that reflect cultural values, social issues or experience. Students describe how cultural perspectives and concepts have been represented when translating and interpreting from one language to another. They describe the experience of learning and using Japanese, considering how intercultural communication involves taking responsibility by modifying language and behaviours. They also explore and express their own cultural identity and ability to act as a cultural mediator between Japanese speakers and Australians.

Students better understand the systems of the Japanese language, identifying some multiple readings of familiar kanji in different compounds. They use understanding of familiar kanji to predict meaning of unknown words, with a satisfactory level of accuracy. Students use familiar vocabulary and apply elements of grammar, with a satisfactory level of accuracy. They use character charts as a systematic framework for recognising patterns for verb conjugation and applying the formation rules of each verb group. Students request and give permission and express prohibition using verb て form and use verb stems with grammatical features, such as ~やすい/にくいです. Students explore how to use plain forms in authentic contexts, such as conversations with peers, and express opinions, intentions and thoughts using the plain form, for example, plain verb つもりです, verb/adjective とおもいます. They use adverbs and intensifiers, such as かなり, and increase cohesion within paragraphs by using conjunctions. Students indicate the status of actions using adverbs, such as まだ and もう, and understand the concept of uchi-soto 内と外 for making appropriate choices of register. Students describe grammatical concepts and language elements, using relevant metalanguage to organise resources. They identify, analyse and compare some textual features and conventions in Japanese and English texts that characterise social and informative media. Students analyse, in part, and explain variations in language use that reflect different social and cultural contexts, purposes and relationships. They describe changes to both Japanese and other language and culture, and identify how language use has the power to influence social and cultural relationships and practices. Students explore how the Japanese language carries embedded cultural information and assumptions that can be difficult for speakers of other languages to interpret.

German+

Achievement standard

At standard, students initiate and participate in sustained spoken and written interactions in German with others through collaborative tasks, activities and transactions to provide information on young people’s experiences and interest in contemporary culture and social issues, such as Sprachen lernen; Verantwortung jetzt und in der Zukunft. They use familiar descriptive and expressive language, in formal and some informal exchanges, to express feelings and justify opinions with some examples. Students contribute ideas, opinions and suggestions in interactions related to exchanging resources and information, solving problems and managing diverse views. Students analyse, synthesise and evaluate some ideas and information from a range of perspectives on texts, and identify how context and culture affect how information is presented in texts related to aspects of their personal, natural and social worlds. They use modes of presentation, generally appropriate to audiences or purposes, to convey information, comments, perspectives and experiences on texts related to aspects of their personal, natural and social worlds. Students analyse how aesthetic, humorous or emotional effects are used in imaginative texts to reflect cultural influence, and create and present simple imaginative texts on familiar personal or social themes that express ideas or that reflect cultural values, social issues or experience. When translating and interpreting from one language to another they describe how cultural perspectives and concepts have been represented, for example, in idioms, such as schwarzfahren, and consider how intercultural communication involves taking responsibility by modifying language and behaviours. Students also explore and express their own cultural identity and ability to act as a cultural mediator between German speakers and Australians.

Students explore the features of spoken and written language and apply, occasionally, variations in relation to features, such as stress, pronunciation and contractions, for example, Mach’s gut! They express the interactive and transitory nature of spoken language, and identify characteristics, such as interactivity, reliance on non-verbal elements and vocal expression. They identify and reproduce, mostly consistently, rhythms in complex sentences, using pausing and intonation to signal clause boundaries and emphasis. Students use familiar vocabulary and apply elements of grammar in spoken and written texts, with a satisfactory level of accuracy. Students analyse how elements of grammar impact on the making of meaning in texts, including, noticing that relative pronouns have gender and case, for example, Das ist der Beruf, den ich am interessantesten finde. They understand and use the appropriate tense with a range of regular and irregular verbs, and use werden to describe future plans and aspirations, for example, In der Zukunft werde ich mehr Sport treiben. They understand and use formulaically common subjunctive forms, such as hätte, wäre and würde.They recognise the use of the genitive case mainly in written texts, for example, das Haus meiner Eltern, and understand that ‘von + dative case + noun’ can be used as an alternative, for example, Das Haus von meinen Eltern. Students use metalanguage to discuss and explain some grammatical forms and functions. They analyse, in part, and explain how and why language is used differently in a range of texts, considering features, such as dialects and register, and identify how language use has the power to influence social and cultural relationships and practices. Students describe how German language and culture are interrelated and how they shape, and are shaped by, each other.

Italian+

Achievement standard

At standard, students initiate and participate in sustained spoken and written interactions in Italian with others through collaborative tasks, activities and transactions to provide information on young people’s experiences and interest in contemporary culture and social issues, such as Cosa possiamo fare per mantenere la salute della terra? They use familiar descriptive and expressive language, in mostly informal exchanges,toexpress feelings and justify opinions, with some examples. They contribute ideas, opinions and suggestions in interactions related to exchanging resources and information, solving problems and managing diverse views. Students identify, analyse and discuss some ideas and information in texts related to aspects of their personal, natural and social worlds, and they identify how some aspects of context and culture affect how information is presented in texts. Students use modes of presentation generally appropriate to audience or purpose to convey information, comments, perspectives and experiences from texts. Students explain instances of how aesthetic, humorous and emotional effects are used in imaginative texts to reflect cultural influence, and they create and present simple imaginative texts on familiar personal or social themes that express ideas or reflect cultural values, social issues or experience. Students describe how some cultural perspectives and concepts have been presented when translating and interpreting from one language to another. They describe the experience of learning and using Italian, considering how intercultural communication involves taking responsibility by modifying language and behaviours. They also describe their own cultural identity and identify their ability to act as a cultural mediator between speakers of Italian and Australians.

Students often use comprehensible Italian pronunciation, stress and intonation in sentences and texts and sometimes adjust rhythm and pace of interactions to assist others in making meaning. They generate written and spoken texts by applying knowledge of familiar vocabulary and grammatical elements, with a satisfactory level of accuracy. Students use prepositions, including articulated prepositions, to introduce additional information when describing actions, people and objects and personal, direct object and reflexive pronouns to refer to the person carrying out an action or to refer to somebody or something. They use adverbs and adverbial phrases of manner, place and time to modify the meaning of verbs and adjectives. Students choose appropriate tenses, including present, present perfect, imperfect and future tenses, and the conditional mood, to describe events across different times, such as Cosa studierai l’anno prossimo e perché?, and they use modal verbs to express ability, possibility, likelihood and permission. They use conjunctions to connect or elaborate clauses, such as Non c’era più da vedere, quindi sono tornato a casa, and they begin to use the future tense and recognise the impersonal and the conditional mood in modelled sentences. Students discuss and explain some grammatical forms and functions using metalanguage, and they analyse and describe how and why language is used differently in a range of texts. Students describe how language varies according to context and speakers and they provide some examples how Italian language and culture have evolved, and how they continue to change over time. They describe how language use has the power to influence social relationships, beliefs and values. Students provide examples of how Italian language and culture are interrelated and how they shape, and are shaped by, each other.

Indonesian+

Achievement standard

At standard, students initiate and participate in sustained spoken and written interactions in Indonesian with others through collaborative tasks, activities and transactions to exchange information on young people’s experiences and interests in contemporary culture and social issues. They use familiar descriptive and expressive language in formal and informal exchanges to share, compare and justify personal opinions, such as Kedatangan siswa petukaran dari Jakarta menambah pengetahuan kami tentang kebudayaan Indonesia. Students engage in shared activities, exchanging resources and information, solving problems and managing diverse views. They participate in transactions, including making complaints and recommendations. Students analyse, synthesise and evaluate some ideas and information from a range of perspectives, and identify how context and culture affect how information is presented in texts related to aspects of their personal, natural and social worlds. Students use modes of presentation, generally appropriate to audiences or purposes, to convey information, comments, perspectives and experiences on texts related to aspects of their personal, natural and social worlds. They explain how aesthetic, humorous or emotional effects are used in imaginative texts to reflect cultural values or experiences. Students create and present simple imaginative texts on familiar personal or social themes that express ideas or that reflect cultural values, social issues or experience. They describe how cultural perspectives and concepts have been represented when translating and interpreting from one language to another. Students describe the experience of learning and using Indonesian, considering how intercultural communication involves taking responsibility by modifying language and behaviours. They also explore and express their own cultural identity and ability to act as a cultural mediator between Indonesian speakers and Australians.

Students apply pronunciation and intonation conventions to new words with affixation and a range of complex sentences, with a satisfactory level of accuracy. They use familiar vocabulary and analyse how elements of grammar impact on the making of meaning in texts to generate spoken and written texts, with a satisfactory level of accuracy. Students use adjectival word order to express possession and refer to abstract ideas by nominalising using prefixes and suffixes, for example, pe-an, per-an, ke-an. They identify syntactic differences between subject-focus and object-focus construction. Students indicate action using, for example, transitive verbs, me-verb system (-kan or -i suffix) in subject-focus and object-focus with di- prefix, duplication of verbs and adverbs as modifiers. They contrast ideas using conjunctions and indicate register using colloquial and formal language. Students express opinions, for example, Saya lebih suka, and influence others by persuading using superlatives, encouraging and advising. They evaluate by using, for example, Pada pendapat saya,and maintain interaction using rhetorical devices and verbal fillers, such as Kalau saya tidak salah. Students use metalanguage to discuss and explain some grammatical forms and functions. They analyse how different types of texts include cultural and contextual elements and analyse and discuss the ways in which Indonesian varies according to spoken and written forms, cultural context and subcultures. They explain how Indonesian language and culture have evolved, and how they continue to change over time. Students identify how language use has the power to influence social and cultural relationships and practices. They describe how Indonesian language and culture are interrelated and how they shape, and are shaped by, each other.

French+

Achievement standard

At standard, students initiate and participate in sustained spoken and written interactions in French with others through collaborative tasks, activities and transactions to provide information on young people’s experiences and interest in contemporary culture and social issues, such as la santé des jeunes, apprendre les langues, les responsabilités maintenant et dans le futur. They use familiar descriptive and expressive language, in formal and some informal exchanges, to express feelings and justify opinions, with some examples. Students contribute ideas, opinions and suggestions in interactions related to exchanging resources and information, solving problems and managing diverse views. Students analyse, synthesise and evaluate some ideas and information from a range of perspectives on texts, and identify how context and culture affect how information is presented in texts related to aspects of their personal, natural and social worlds. They use modes of presentation, generally appropriate to audiences or purposes, to convey information, comments, perspectives and experiences on texts related to aspects of their personal, natural and social worlds. Students explain how aesthetic, humorous or emotional effects are used in imaginative texts to reflect cultural influence, and create and present simple imaginative texts on familiar personal or social themes that express ideas or that reflect cultural values, social issues or experience. When translating and interpreting from one language to another they describe how cultural perspectives and concepts have been represented. They describe the experience of learning and using French, considering how intercultural communication involves taking responsibility by modifying language and behaviours. They also explore and express their own cultural identity and ability to act as a cultural mediator between French speakers and Australians.

Students better understand the systems of the French language, applying, with some inaccuracies, regular and irregular elements of spoken and written French, using non-verbal elements, liaisons, accents and expression to engage interest. Students use familiar vocabulary and apply elements of grammar in spoken and written texts, with a satisfactory level of accuracy. Students analyse how elements of grammar impact on the making of meaning in texts, including identifying how grammatical choices can shade meaning, determine perspective and establish relationship, for example, shifting from the use of vous to tu can signal a more informal, friendly relationship. They explore how choices of words, such as nouns and adjectives can indicate values and attitudes, for example, C’est un brave jeune homme and Ce sont des réfugiés. Students use le présent, l’impératif, le futur proche, le passé composé and l’imparfait, and use le futur and le conditionnel in simple constructions. Students identify that past participles agree with the preceding direct object when the verb is conjugated with the auxiliary verb avoir, for example, J’ai acheté une tartelette aux fraises — je l’ai mangée trop vite ! They use infinitive verb forms and phrasal verbs, such as avoir besoin de faire quelque chose, and relative, emphatic and direct/indirect object pronouns. Students use metalanguage to discuss and explain some grammatical forms and functions. They analyse how different types of text include cultural and contextual elements, and explain how and why language is used differently in a range of texts. They explain how French language and culture have evolved, and how they continue to change over time, and identify how language use has the power to influence social and cultural relationships and practices. Students describe how French language and culture are interrelated and how they shape, and are shaped by, each other.

Technologies

Design and Technologies+

Achievement standard

At Standard, students consider social, ethical and sustainability factors that impact on designed solutions, complexity of design, and production processes. They outline how design decisions, and/or economic, environmental and social sustainability is influenced by emerging technologies. In Engineering principles and systems, students identify the process of combining of materials with force, motion and energy to create solutions. In Food and fibre production, students outline the role emerging research and technology has on the design of ethical and sustainable food and fibre products. In Food specialisations, students identify ways to prepare and present foods for healthy eating using processing skills and techniques, applying knowledge of nutrients, principles of food safety, preparation, presentation, preservation, physical and sensory properties and perceptions. In Materials and technologies specialisations, students combine a range of characteristics and properties of materials, systems, components, tools, technologies and equipment to create designed solutions.

With all Design and Technology contexts, students identify the needs of the client/stakeholder to determine the basis for a solution. They create and critique design briefs. Students investigate components/resources to develop increasingly sophisticated solutions, identifying and considering associated constraints. They apply design thinking, creativity, enterprise skills and innovation to develop, modify and communicate design ideas of increasing sophistication. Students design possible solutions, analysing designs against criteria, including functionality, accessibility, usability and aesthetics, using appropriate technical terms and technology. They select, justify and safely implement and test appropriate technologies and processes to make solutions. Students provide relevant analysis of design processes and solutions against student-developed criteria. They work independently, and collaboratively to manage projects, using digital technology and an iterative and collaborative approach. Students consider time, cost, risk, safety, production processes, sustainability and legal responsibilities.

Digital Technologies+

Achievement standard

At Standard, students describe the role of hardware and software in managing, controlling and securing access to data, in networked digital systems. They describe the process of simple compression of data and how content data is separated from presentation data. Students apply techniques for acquiring, storing and validating quantitative and qualitative data from a range of sources, and consider privacy and security requirements. They analyse, visualise and model processes and entities, and their relationships, using structured data. Students create a design for algorithms represented diagrammatically and in structured English, including iteration. They validate algorithms and programs, using commonly accepted methods. Students implement data storage and organisation techniques within a programming environment. They create interactive solutions for sharing ideas and information online, taking into account social contexts and legal responsibilities.

In Digital Technologies, students identify the needs of the client/stakeholder to determine the basis for a solution. They create and critique briefs. Students investigate components/resources to develop increasingly sophisticated solutions, identifying and considering associated constraints. They apply design thinking, creativity, enterprise skills and innovation to develop, modify and communicate design ideas of increasing sophistication. Students design possible solutions, analysing designs against criteria, including functionality, accessibility, usability and aesthetics, using appropriate technical terms and technology. They select, justify and safely implement and test appropriate technologies and processes to make solutions. Students provide relevant analysis of design processes and solutions against student-developed criteria. They work independently, and collaboratively to manage projects, using digital technology and an iterative and collaborative approach. Students consider time, cost, risk, safety, production processes, sustainability and legal responsibilities.

The Arts

Media Arts+

Achievement standard

At Standard, students apply mostly correct media terminology specific to the task and chosen context. They select and use codes with some effectiveness to construct meaning, select and combine narrative conventions appropriate to genre or purpose and use some conventions to position audience. Students use selection processes to construct representations of ideas, issues and people that reflect or challenge values. They demonstrate social and cultural sensitivity in media work by complying with controls and audience values. Students complete most required planning, and select and safely use technology to create and edit planned media work, applying problem-solving processes with mostly effective results. They fulfil most personal and team timeline responsibilities and contribute to some team problem solving.

Students describe, in their own work and the work of others, aspects, and explain the impact, of media work in relation to audience and purpose in a variety of contexts. They describe the impact of past and current trends on how audiences use media.

Drama+

Achievement standard

At Standard, students use contemporary processes, including improvisation and approaches to rehearsal, to select and shape the elements of drama for devised and scripted drama. They demonstrate awareness in performance of drama forms and styles, spaces of performance and design and technologies to communicate dramatic meaning and to impact on audience.

Students engage in reflective and analytical processes to make links between the choices made in performance and their effect on dramatic meaning and impact on audience. They accurately use a range of generalised drama terminology in their oral and written responses.

Dance+

Achievement standard

At Standard, students use structured improvisation to sometimes expand movement vocabulary. They select and manipulate, with some purpose, the elements of dance (BEST), use specified choreographic devices and structure to choreograph dance that communicates choreographic intent. Students execute technical dance skills safely in a particular genre/style, demonstrating coordination, some control of body alignment and some inconsistencies in accuracy of movement appropriate to the choreography. They perform dance to an audience demonstrating, on occasion, accuracy in retention and clarity of movement, projection, focus, musicality, appropriate expression and commitment to the movement, reflecting the choreographic intent throughout the performance.

Students use reflective and some analytical writing to discuss the effectiveness of the choices made in the use of BEST, choreographic processes and design concepts and how they contribute to the choreographic intention of their own and others’ dance. They use some relevant dance terminology. Students outline how particular dance genres/styles are influenced by the contexts in which they exist.

Music+

Achievement standard

At Standard, students identify, apply, notate and perform rhythmic and melodic concepts and harmonic progressions in major and minor keys, with some partial or inconsistent responses. They improvise, select and integrate elements of music to create musical works, developing and maintaining compositional ideas, with some inconsistency. Students use generally accurate notation and incorporate some appropriate stylistic conventions and expressive devices. They perform with generally sound technique and some appropriate expression and stylistic performance conventions. With some guidance, they consider blend and balance when playing with an ensemble and endeavour to adjust pitch, tone and volume.

Students identify, analyse and compare the use and purpose of the elements of music in a range of works, using some appropriate music terminology and making occasional references to stylistic application. They identify and compare musical characteristics, considering stylistic features and contributions made by key composers, performers and/or artists, and make connections between social, historical and cultural contexts.

Visual Arts+

Achievement standard

At Standard, students prepare ideas that relate to a personal style and chosen studio discipline. They explore media, materials, techniques and technologies, documenting results to plan choices. Students apply elements and principles and visual art conventions, to suit a chosen art style and/or art form. They consider design alternatives and exhibit evidence of a personal style. Using visual art language, students describe artistic influence and provide reflective comments about decisions made in the creative process. They identify features of an art style and apply them to the exploration of ideas. Students maintain a plan in the development of an idea for a final design, produce a finished artwork and communicate their own artistic intention. Students use equipment and materials in a safe manner. They select techniques, materials and processes to represent an idea, subject or style. They make choices about presentation conventions and consider audience context. Students provide an artist statement about their own interpretation of an idea, theme and audience.

Students analyse art forms, from different times and places and provide responses about meaning, style and intent. They present personal opinions and judgements, and use visual art language to describe the artwork of others. Students comment on how visual conventions are used to enhance composition. They provide an interpretation about artwork from different cultures and discuss artists’ intent. Students make comparisons between artwork from different times and describe meaning, viewpoints, similarities and differences, supported by visual evidence. They judge the effectiveness and importance of artwork. Students provide a reflection of their own artwork and the artwork of others.

Year 10 Curriculum